Who ate all the...Well, everything.

I feel so guilty, says mother of Britain's fattest teenager as Georgia, 17, hits 40st

The mother of Georgia Davis, who has faced an agonising yo-yo diet battle and now weighs a quarter-ton, today admitted she feels guilty about her daughter's colossal size.

I should think she does too. Her 17 year old daughter weighs 40st. That is terrible parenting.

In the past, Lesley admitted she fed Georgia condensed milk when she wouldn't drink regular milk as an infant and feeding her potatoes instead of baby food.
However, she said she had made a determined effort to change their diets since Georgia returned from a U.S. health farm - such as making her own chips instead of buying them from the takeaway.

The force is strong in this one. Not.

She told The Sun: 'People will blame me. But you can't watch your children 24 hours a day.'

No you can't, but that is a lame excuse. Who gave her all the money she needed to get this fat?

Come here to me....

And here's a try at blaming others:
She added that promised help from the NHS - from free gym membership to a personal trainer - had not materialised.

I'm always against the NHS trying to penalise people for their own life choices; we pay for the NHS so it should just shut up and treat us when needed, but a personal trainer? I think I've just found the line that shouldn't be crossed.

Yesterday, Georgia admitted her weight gain depresses her so much that she responds by eating even more.

Well there's not much hope for you then, is there chuck. Until you can face up to your obvious problem, nothing else is going to do you any good.
Ms Davis said she had enjoyed playing sport in America but that the same facilities weren't available in her home town and she couldn't afford to join the local gym.

Lay off the pies and go for the occasional walk. It's not difficult. If you don't spend so much money on take away crap for every meal, maybe you will be able to afford the gym.
Georgia said she wants more help from the NHS, saying her problem is no different from drug or alcohol addiction.

You could argue that it's no different to drug or alcohol addiction. I could argue that it isn't the remit of the NHS to treat people for addictions. You need to help yourself and your no good mother needs to do more as well.

The comments on this story are very unsympathetic, too.

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